+ Reply
Log in or Register to participate in these discussions
Strengthening or harmful
CandiceRG
98 Posts
Normally tonight would be a sad and anxious time with chemo looming tomorrow, but not this time, such a relief !!!!
I am wondering how I know if I am pushing myself too hard vs pushing myself to the point of strengthening?
What are warning signs that I have crossed a safe threshold?
​​​​​
​​​​​
11 Replies
supersu
1477 Posts

@CandiceRG
good morning Candice.
sending my best wishes that your chemo goes smooth as silk today.
so cold and dark here in Alberta, good snuggle up on the couch weather that's for sure.

your question is an interesting one. how do we know when we push too hard? I don't know the answer to that! I suppose if you are asking the question, you might be afraid you are pushing too far? is there someone, (social worker, counsellor or nurse), that you can speak with today at the cancer centre?? they might be able to provide some clarity.

I'm glad that you are feeling less sadness and anxiety this time around. to me that means that something you are doing is helping with those type of feelings.

have as good a day as you can
cheering you on from the cancer connection community sideline.
su

#chemotoday #cheeringyouon

ACH2015
2486 Posts

@CandiceRG

Hi Candice, the way I read your post, you have completed chemo. Many of us suffer side effects from chemo and other treatments. One of the main side effects I suffered was fatigue. It takes time to cycle the chemo drugs from our bodies, and regain strength in mind and body. Start slow and work your way up to greater levels of physical activity. Walking is a simple way to start out with a short route that you increase over time. This can be done with any activity you enjoy. I think we each know when we have pushed ourselves too hard. I am sure as time goes on, you will see the difference between strengthening and over doing things.

I want to share a resource with you from the Canadian Cancer Society that helped me:

https://cdn.cancer.ca/-/media/files/cancer-information/resources/publications/life-after-cancer/32060-life-after-cancer-treatment-en.pdf?rev=ad4b66e5184e460ead7d78e8e6875116&hash=8DC741A1D8B6F08AC362B524BAC96367&_gl=1*16n2iay*_ga*Mzg2OTE4NTAyLjE2Njc4MjczMzM.*_ga_23YMKBE2C3*MTY2NzgyNzMzMy4xLjEuMTY2NzgyNzQyMS40MC4wLjA.

The sections on Healthy Living and Dealing with Side Effects stand out to me that may be of interest to you at this time.

Keep well

ACH2015

CandiceRG
98 Posts

@supersu thank you for the feedback and compassion. I am actually done chemo as if 2 weeks ago:)

I will be talking with my Dr. On the 25th and will ask her for info.

STay safe and warm today ☺️

Candice

CandiceRG
98 Posts

@ACH2015
Yes I am done chemo :)

Thank you for the info and the link I will check it out.

I live on a small acreage with a couple horses and have been able to do outdoor chores the second week after chemo but now that winter is here it's much tougher. Two days in a row I'm breathing hard, sweating and rubber legs when I finish. I can back off and get more help from my husband but I do want to progress towards being strong again. I look forward to reading the post.

Take care,

Candice

ACH2015
2486 Posts

@CandiceRG

Hi Candice, I too had a small farm and two horses many years ago. I know how demanding the upkeep and chores can be when we are healthy - let alone after enduring cancer treatments. Chemo affects not only the cancer cells, but all cells in our body. Sometimes people don't understand how much energy our bodies consume in rebuilding these good cells. Exercise, rest, diversion, relaxation, chores and a positive outlook all go toward recovery and regaining our endurance and strength. Give yourself some time to recover for what you have had to endure mentally and physically. Do what you feel you can do, and over time, your endurance will improve and you will be back in the saddle again! But, don't be afraid to seek assistance and not over do it to the point of exhaustion. Find that balance.

I found the information in the link I shared with you reassuring in that I am not the only one with these concerns, fears and questions. I hope you find the information as useful and reassuring as I did.

Keep well

ACH2015

CandiceRG
98 Posts

@ACH2015 it is Alway good to hear from someone who understands:) I've been reading the booklet and it is definitely something I needed to see. It's so hard to accept that I can't just will myself to normalcy. Thank you again for sharing 💜

Cynthia Mac
4215 Posts
CandiceRG‍ My mom was a huge advocate of listening to your body. Doing something like a guided relaxation or meditation might give you a mechanism for such a “checking in” with yourself. Journaling might be another option.

You might also look into consulting with a personal trainer or physiotherapist who deals with cancer patients. They might have some pointers for you.

When my Dad was in chemo, he had to learn a new set of limitations for a while, too. He had chronic pain for many years due to a neck injury early in life, and he had to learn the difference between doing “enough” and doing harm. I hope you are able to find your balance.
Charles
133 Posts
Are you talking about physical strengthening, or emotional strengthening ?

I can understand feeling "relief", on the eve of starting chemotherapy. A bunch of difficult decisions have been made. You're following what you decided was the best course of action.

. . . Tomorrow, all you have to do is show up, lie back, and get infused.

If you've come to this situation with a religious framework, you could say:
. . . "OK, God, I've done what I can. It's Your turn, now."

Nothing about cancer is easy.

. Charles​​​​​​​
CandiceRG
98 Posts

@Charles hello and thank you for taking the time to offer support but the relief was because I have completed chemo and no longer felt the stress and dread i normally would have felt that day.

I was more wondering about physical strength :)

take care :)

Mammabear
344 Posts

@CandiceRG like others have said. Everyone is different and your body will tell you. When I was in chemo and had a good week I kept up my running routine. I maintained my yoga throughout although not when nauseous (downward dog bad).

It took me a full year post treatment to get back to my previous fitness and activity level.

Now that I am stage 4 I have lowered the bar. I make a list. Do 1 or 2 things, then rest and leave the rest for another day.

Hang in there.

Charles
133 Posts

@CandiceRG:
@ACH2015 it is Alway good to hear from someone who understands:) I've been reading the booklet and it is definitely something I needed to see. It's so hard to accept that I can't just will myself to normalcy. Thank you again for sharing 💜

You wrote the magic words yourself.

You'll heal as fast as your body can heal, no faster. I haven't seen – in my own experience, or my friends' stories – that there's any way to speed up the process.

That's not an invitation to lie back and watch TV all day – not even if you move the TV set into the barn.(*) But neither can you “will yourself to normalcy” – it won't work, and your body may react like a rusty, un-oiled machine, if you try.

Progress little by little, with occasional setbacks – that seems to be what works.

(*) I'm a city person. As I think about it, putting an extra TV into the barn, and watching it with the horses, when you get tired, might be nice for all of you.😀

+ Reply