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The journey begins

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Lacey_adminCCS on May 4, 2018 11:17 am

Raleigh‍ 

You have a great outlook. I wish you all the best with radiation. Please keep us posted and let us know how it goes.

We are here for you,
Lacey

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Raleigh on May 4, 2018 4:03 pm

Thank you Lacey.  What I want most from these postings is hopefully help others who are in this same situation.  I have appreciated all the advice I have received so far on what to be aware of during treatment.    I thank each and everyone for the support.  This connection with others who have or have had cancer is giving me such insight.  My only other experience regarding cancer was my Mom who passed away in 1995.  Things have come a long way since then, thankfully.

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Raleigh on May 8, 2018 5:34 am

As part of my treatment along with radiation and some chemo to enhance the radiation will be brachytherapy.  Anyone have any insight on this therophy?  I know I have to be hospitalized over night and it is radiation but are there any after effects? 

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Elsie13 on May 10, 2018 8:53 pm

Hi Raleigh‍ ‍ .  I found this article: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/diagnosis-and-treatment/radiation-therapy/internal-radiation-therapy/?region=qc  .
In 2016: diagnosed with stage 2 ovarian cancer. Treatment: hysterectomy, chemo, radiation. Afterwards: No Evidence of Disease!

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Raleigh on May 12, 2018 4:58 pm

Anyone else thinks cancer thrives on sugar?  When I was diagnoised and told my girls the first words out of their mouths was don't eat sugar.   Sugar feeds cancer they said.   So I gave up the sweets and anything with artificial sweeteners.  After a bit I noticed the blood I was passing was slowing down.  Could it be?  Then my youngest came home to be with her father and I to meet with the doctor.  She requested some jam/lemon filled doughnuts.  (Spoiled kid). Well I walked past them all day and finally in the evening gave in and ate one.  Over the next few days the bleeding increased and now has subsided again.  Was it the sugar that caused it?   But when you think about, when they did the MRI they injected me with glucose to go find/highlight the cancer.    I may never know for sure.

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Brighty on May 12, 2018 5:54 pm

Raleigh‍  I've heard of studies where they say different things.   People will say yes, and other studies will say there is no proof that cancer feeds on sugar.    All I know is what I've seen.........I see perfectly healthy people who never eat sugar and keep healthy lifesyles and still get cancer, and then there's those who eat horribly, have awful lifestyles, and nothing happens to them.   It's just pure random, luck of the draw in my opinion.      I say everything in moderation.     Treating yourself to a piece of cake or cookie once in a while is not going to kill anyone, as long as your not eating the whole cake or whole box of cookies.   My grandfather ate nothing but chocolate cake, hambergers and french fries and lived to be a ripe old age..............so I honestly think it's just random who gets cancer and who doesn't, not because of sugar intake.  I could be wrong, it's just my opinion. ..................anyone else out there who feels differently?    
Help is out there. All you have to do is reach out.

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Raleigh on May 12, 2018 7:41 pm

Brighty I agree, each and everyone of us are different.   My Dad was 88 when diagnosed with chronic leukaemia.  He asked his specialist what causes cancer and the reply was "If I knew the answer to that question I would be a rich man."  It is now 20 years since Dad passed away and still no one has the answer.   I just know I feel a whole lot better without eating the sweet stuff and have lost some weight as well.   

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Brighty on May 12, 2018 8:24 pm

Raleigh‍  ya, if it makes you feel better not to eat the sweet stuff, then yes, go for it!      Like I said I think cancer is just random bad luck....although my fiance's esophegal cancer the doctors are saying was caused by smoking and drinking....but I also know lots of people who smoke and drink and nothing happens to them.....so who really knows what the answer is.     
Help is out there. All you have to do is reach out.

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Cynthia Mac on May 13, 2018 8:29 am

Raleigh‍ , My sister is in the “sugar’s a no-no” camp.  She railed on the doctors who gave her fiancé Boost to drink when he was in hospital (stage 4 lung cancer). When our father was diagnosed, she started him on alkaline water. 

Many celebrity doctors (Dr. Oz., Dr. Ian Smith and the young guy from the Doctors show) say we should strip all “white food” - bread, flour, rice, and sugar - out of our diets.

The dietician who was with Dad for his chemo run kind of phoo-pohed the “sugar is evil” message. It leaves you wondering what to think.

Interestingly, the alkaline water (a sliced lemon, with 2 heaping tsp pink salt in 2 litres of water) really helped Dad’s gastric system. Whether or not it helps him with cancer cell formation, we will never know.
“When the root is deep, there is no reason to fear the wind.” - Japanese saying

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Lacey_adminCCS on May 14, 2018 10:15 am

Sugar and cancer

Over the past few years, there have been reports, e-mails and websites that say eating
sugar feeds cancer or that sugar makes cancer grow faster. All cells in your body consume
sugar as they grow and divide, but eating sugar does not make cancer cells grow faster.

Sugar is found naturally in fruit, vegetables, milk and honey. It is also added to other foods
like soft drinks, juice drinks, desserts and condiments to make them sweeter.

Every cell in your body requires sugar (glucose) for energy. Your body can also store sugar to
use as energy later. Your body needs this sugar to function normally. Because we consume
thousands of dietary components every day, it is difficult to understand the links between
diet and cancer.

What we do know is that Canadians eat a lot of sugar every day. Eating lots of foods that
have sugar added means you are more likely to put on weight. Research shows that being
overweight or obese increases your risk of cancer. Being obese may cause changes in
hormone levels. Changes to sex hormones or insulin might increase the risk of developing
breast, colon or uterine cancer. A healthy body weight will be different for everyone, so check
with your doctor about what a healthy body weight is for you.

More information on cancer.ca 
Sugar
Nutrition and fitness
Healthy body weight



Read more: http://www.cancer.ca/en/prevention-and-screening/reduce-cancer-risk/make-info
rmed-decisions/myths-and-controversies/sugar/?region=on#ixzz5FUAjgd
s8

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Raleigh on May 17, 2018 1:43 pm

Thanks for the "sugar" feedback.

I start my treatments next Thursday with chemo/radiation on the first day.  A bit scared but happy to get the show on the road.   Have an excellent support group (family and friends) and medical team.   

Hope everyone has an amazing long weekend. 

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Raleigh on May 25, 2018 5:42 am

Yesterday had my first chemo and radiation treatment.  All went well and better then what I expected.  A positive experience.  Staff are exceptional and so compassionate.   

It was a long day and to add to it hubby had to make a run to the ER with a tick bite he got on the weekend stretching the day out longer for him and worry for me as he made me stay home to rest.  Always something to keep the ball rolling.  Thankfully it hasn't developed into Lyme disease because he caught it early.

Now off for my next radiation.  Have a great day everyone.

 

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Raleigh on May 25, 2018 2:55 pm

Yesterday during chemo I met this amazing woman.  Her name is Audrey Parker.  She did an interview on CTV Atlantic entitled "

N.S. woman shares cancer journey in hopes of changing the way people view death"


If you search Audrey Parker Halifax you can read her story.  Inspirational and thought provoking.

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Raleigh on May 30, 2018 1:14 pm

My first meeting with the Radiation Oncologist was today.   I wanted to know more about where and what my cancer looked like.  He showed me the ultra sound and explained it all.  Then he showed me where the radiation was being targeted  on my body.  Very interesting.  He also told me that only one lymp was cancerous and another looked suspicious.   One week of treatments done.  Tomorrow is the weekly chemo.   Having said all that these past two days I have been feeling my old self which is good.   Taking it one day at a time.

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Raleigh on Jun 14, 2018 2:34 pm

Over half way thru my treatments.  The end is in sight.  The bleeding has been reduced to nearly nothing now. After 8 months I am so ready for that.  Not having to many issues except gas in my bowel that requires  lots of walking thru the halls to move the gas out of the way of the radiation before treatment can be given.   

Looking forward to warmer weather,  sitting on our deck and enjoying the river and not having to travel every day.

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Lacey_adminCCS on Jun 14, 2018 3:02 pm

You're so close Raleigh‍! Glad to hear you looking forward to things you enjoy!

Hang in there :)
Lacey

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Raleigh on Jun 26, 2018 4:53 pm

Talked to my oncologist today.   Asked him the before I started treatment and where I am at now.  The tumour was 2-3 cm and now it has now shrunk to look like a ulcer.  Oncologist is happy with progress and I am elated.
Finish radiation Friday and then in two weeks I have my second brachytherapy.    Looking forward to getting back to my new normal.
 

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Raleigh on Jun 30, 2018 6:18 am

Yesterday I got to ring the bell.  25 radiation, 5 chemo and one internal radiation under my belt.  The protocol for any pelvic cancers.  Now to take time to heal my body.   Will see my oncologist in about six weeks for follow up.   Have a great Canada Day weekend everyone.  

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Raleigh on Sep 19, 2018 10:38 am

Had my first check up after treatment.  Oncologist did the usual exam and found a small white scar where the cancer had been.  Next step is a CT scan to ensure the lymphs that were cancerous are clear.  

I guess I am like many others.  Every little twitch or pain or whatever wasn't there before or I never noticed causes me to think "what's that, is it back somewhere else."  Hopefully that will go away in time.  I am still having to take naps most days and find during the nights I wake up sweating wet and it is cool in the room.  It also seems a certain time in the evening when I just get chilled and can't get warm.  Anyone else experience of these things?  

Have a a great day everyone.

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Lianne_adminCCS on Sep 19, 2018 12:29 pm

Hi Raleigh‍ 
First off - I missed your post about ringing the bell so congrats on that!
As to your last post, I found after almost 6 weeks of radiation that the fatigue stuck around for quite some time. The "what's that, is it back somewhere else" is a common "side effect" of coming out the other end of treatment. I am now 7 years out of treatment and while it does rear its head on occasion,  those thoughts and fears take up far less real estate in my brain than they did earlier on.
Let us know how the CT scan goes
Have a great day as well

Lianne

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Lacey_adminCCS on Sep 19, 2018 3:47 pm

Raleigh‍ 

Good to hear from you again. Congrats on finishing treatment, I hope your test results come back okay.

I thought you might want to check out these threads- you're not alone friend.

Cancer Related Fatigue Video
Dancing with fear

Please keep us posted, 
Lacey

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Raleigh on Oct 2, 2018 8:35 pm

Had my CZt scan ladtbTuesday and a meeting with my radiation oncologist today.  Looks like the original cancer sites are clear but the scan showed 2 cancer spots on my liver.      Need to get that attended to asap in my books.  I will give them until Thursday to get the ball rolling before I start making phone calls.   Doctor indicated a round of chemo.treatments.  I only finished the radiation/chemo for the vaginal cancer on Zjune 29th.   3 months is not long enough between finishing up one before starting another.  Feeling a bit frustrated at the moment but ready to get this done and looking forward that 2019 will be a better year.

Re: The journey begins

Posted by Elsie13 on Oct 3, 2018 3:27 pm

Raleigh‍ You must be feeling extremely frustrated, after just finishing treatments a few months ago. So I totally agree, don't wait too long - phone and find out what happens next! 
In 2016: diagnosed with stage 2 ovarian cancer. Treatment: hysterectomy, chemo, radiation. Afterwards: No Evidence of Disease!